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IN CONVERSATION WITH...  EUDON CHOI

IN CONVERSATION WITH...

EUDON CHOI

IN CONVERSATION WITH...  EUDON CHOI

Miranda Sawyer Interview

The fashion designer, who hails from Korea but is very much a Londoner, has been feted for his beautiful tailoring and quietly luxurious pieces. Now he has created an exclusive collection of limited edition coats for us

IN CONVERSATION WITH...  EUDON CHOI

Eudon Choi is not a household name – not yet, anyway – but in the fashion world, his is definitely a name worth dropping. Although he’s only had his own label since 2009, he can count Sienna Miller, Jade Jagger and Gwyneth Paltrow among his devotees. What attracts the top-end fashionistas to Eudon is his precise and beautiful tailoring. He grew up in South Korea, and while in his home country, was trained and worked in menswear.

On moving to the UK in 2003, he switched to womenswear, studying at the RCA and working with All Saints and Twenty8Twelve before setting up his own label. Still, his clothes retain the accuracy and care of menswear cutting. When combined with his thorough fashion research and eclectic, if not outré, taste (he is as likely to be inspired by modernist architecture as he is by a Nineties supermodel shoot), this means that Eudon Choi’s clothes are ideal for the working woman’s wardrobe.

Sophisticated but not boring. Gorgeous but not frou-frou. Luxurious but not OTT. Always cool, always perfectly cut, but, he insists, ‘never androgynous. Always feminine and sensuous’.  

Eudon Choi is not a household name – not yet, anyway – but in the fashion world, his is definitely a name worth dropping. Although he’s only had his own label since 2009, he can count Sienna Miller, Jade Jagger and Gwyneth Paltrow among his devotees. What attracts the top-end fashionistas to Eudon is his precise and beautiful tailoring. He grew up in South Korea, and while in his home country, was trained and worked in menswear.

On moving to the UK in 2003, he switched to womenswear, studying at the RCA and working with All Saints and Twenty8Twelve before setting up his own label. Still, his clothes retain the accuracy and care of menswear cutting. When combined with his thorough fashion research and eclectic, if not outré, taste (he is as likely to be inspired by modernist architecture as he is by a Nineties supermodel shoot), this means that Eudon Choi’s clothes are ideal for the working woman’s wardrobe.

Sophisticated but not boring. Gorgeous but not frou-frou. Luxurious but not OTT. Always cool, always perfectly cut, but, he insists, ‘never androgynous. Always feminine and sensuous’.

The nice touch of our collection was always to have a menswear element, so there’s an internal pocket, details to hide the buttons, that kind of thing.’ The resulting coats are timeless and very covetable. There are a couple of lovely long-line, double-breasted numbers – one in a check and one with a hem frill. There are two with wraparound collars that fall just so, and another, slimmer, collarless one with buckles that references the military look without fuss.

They're desirable and made to last. ‘Yes, I want to believe that my collection comprises investment pieces that can easily meld with any woman’s wardrobe and update it. And last longer,’ he says. ‘For me, tailoring is an investment. I am still wearing coats I bought 18 years ago.’

What’s the next big trend you’re most excited about?

Tailoring. The return of tailoring. Fashion has been dominated by street fashion. But for last fall/winter collection, I am seeing the return of tailoring, which I am so excited about. And now we just did a tailoring collection with John Lewis! These coats are investment pieces, very beautifully made.

How would you style the pieces from your collection?

You can style them any way. Put over jeans, wear them for work, any way you like. With tailoring you get pieces that would last in your wardrobe for a good amount of time, and you can just adapt them in every season differently.

What’s influencing fashion at the moment culturally?

It’s a very confusing time in politics right now, and this means, I think, that diversity is important. Designers should take the lead, adopt diverse imagery, be diverse in casting or whatever, show that people are different and embrace individuality.

What’s great about the British approach to fashion?

London is about accepting who you are, and not caring about what other people think. That is a fundamental element for being creative as well. You see crazy stuff deep down in east London, and there are just so many museums. It’s just a melting pot of cultures.